Five examples of nearmisses

1. Lifting eye welding broke

Incident:
When hoisting an electric motor in the engine room, the welding broke on the lifting eye to which the chain block was attached The electric motor fell from a height of about 3 m and landed just centimetres from the crewman operating the chain block.

Possible outcome:
Person maimed or killed

Reason:
Bad welding

Remedial action:
Load testing of lifting eyes after installation and SWL clearly identified for such lifting eyes.
 


2. Chuck jaw flew off lathe when starting

Incident:
During training for engine room duties, an assistant inquired about the metal lathe in the engine room workshop. Two experienced hands explained how it worked but when they started the lathe, one of the three jaws flew off.

Possible outcome:
The lathe had been set up for a speed of 12,000 rpm meaning that a jaw flying off could cause serious damage, and potentially kill someone if it hit them.

Reason:
The three jaws on the lathe chuck are removable so they can be turned or replaced, and they had not been tightened after the last replacement /turn.

Remedial action:
A sign has been subsequently posted by the lathe to say that jaws must be checked for tightness before starting and the incident was discussed at a subsequent crew info meeting to prevent it happening again.  The company's other ships were informed of the incident.


3. Crane moved sideways unintentionally (defective controls)

Incident:
While readying a crane, a stevedore started the pumps on a heavy duty crane to lift the boom off its rest cradle.  When the emergency stop was released on the operator console, the boom jerked sideways without the console having been touched.  The boom lifted from its rest cradle and hit a hatch.  There was only cosmetic damage to the boom and hatch.

Possible outcome:
Serious personal injury.  If the boat had been in its place, the boom, boat and several of the boom wires would have been damaged.

Reason:
Faulty operator console on the heavy duty boom.

Remedial action:
Information to crew that when starting cranes and other winches, etc., they should be ready to press the emergency stop.  The stevedore was also told that all operations should be stopped in the event of any unintended movement.  The ship's crew are to be notified of the fault.


4. Anchor dropped close to diver working below

Incident:
During an incident with broken mooring lines due to a weak bollard, the ship started to drift away from the quay and the starboard anchor was then dropped while a diving company was working on the bow thruster tunnel. The diving company had seen what was happening to the ship and pulled the diver away from the situation before the anchor dropped. Neither the bridge nor the people on the bow remembered in this situation that there were people working below and were not clear about where the diver was.

Possible outcome:
The anchor could have hit the diver.

Reason:
A situation with wind gusting to 35 m/s and the ship's mooring lines broke. The bow thrusters were disconnected due to divers working on them and also that it takes several minutes to get the main engine started.

Remedial action:
Signs saying "Divers in the water" have now been made and are to be placed on the anchor brakes when divers are working at the bow. If the signs had been there during the incident, the person at the anchor could have reminded the captain about the diver and could then have made sure that the diver was at a safe distance before letting go the anchor. A new procedure/checklist for diving operations has now implemented in safety management system.


5. Stopper parted during mooring

Incident:
On arrival, the ship lay starboard to along the quay.  With the wind getting up to about 10 m/sec, the ship was lying about 1.5 m from the quay and it was decided to use the mooring lines to heave the ship right close to the quay.  When one line had been heaved tight and was to be stopped off, the rope stopper parted and the line ran out.

Possible outcome:
The officer holding the stopper felt a sharp jerk on his elbow. The sharp jerk on his arm could have caused damage to joint or muscles.

Reason:
The stopper parted.

Remedial action:
A trial has been made of another type of stopper and the old stoppers have all been replaced with new.

 

Senior Occupational Health Consultant

Søren Bøge Pedersen

sbo@seahealth.dk

+45 3311 1833

+45 5364 1609

I can help you with:

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  • The 8 Safety Links
  • Accident prevention in general
  • Guidance on mooring
  • Welfare-enhancing projects
  • Consultancy
  • The program Health and Safety at Sea